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essay: Forgiveness of sins explained

August 3, 2014


We are forgiven at salvation, as a result of the cross. Eph 1:7 ; Col 1:14    We were NOT forgiven at the cross!

(sins are forgiven at salvation Acts 10:43)

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Some Christian preachers have falsely claimed, that it’s unnecessary for Christians to confess their sins  for forgiveness (1 Jn 1:9), because, they say, all our sins were forgiven at the cross.

But three scriptures contradict this false doctrine.

(1) Jesus’ model prayer instructs us to pray for our own forgiveness  (Luke11:4).

(2) He says in Matthew 6:15, God will not forgive us if we do not forgive others.

(3) “And when you were dead in your transgressions and the uncircumcision of your flesh, He made you alive (salvation) together with Him, having forgiven us all our transgressions. Col 2:13

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The cross was all judgement! Christ was judged for our sins on the cross, and he paid the price for all our sins (spiritual death) on the cross. But forgiveness of sins comes at a point AFTER Christ said “it is finished”. Jn 19:30

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The judgment of our sins and forgiveness were separated by our Lord’s statement on the Cross, “It is finished” (Gr. Tetelesti Jn 19:30) No one ever has forgiveness of sins until he believes in Christ. (Acts 10:43)

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The word “redemption” and the word “forgiveness” in Eph 1:7 (an Atticism) are both in the accusative case in the Greek. see below: They are a “double accusative”. Therefore, the phrase “the forgiveness of sins” is not an explanation of the previous phrase “the redemption through His blood.”

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(1) The word “forgiveness” is an accusative of result, and NOT an accusative of apposition (an explanation). The word “redemption” is the accusative of direct object. Forgiveness is a result of redemption. Not an explanation of redemption.
(2) These two accusatives are a double accusative: the accusative of direct object and the accusative of result. They can also be described as a double accusative of primary and secondary object. The primary objective is redemption. The secondary objective is forgiveness. One follows the other; they are not simultaneous. Forgiveness follows redemption. Forgiveness is separated from redemption.

Notice this detail in Eph 1:7, the noun redemption and the noun forgiveness are separated be the phrase, “through his blood” (atonement). They are NOT in apposition.

This phrase could be read as follows,,,”as a result of the redemptive work on the cross, we have forgiveness“.

And we know we weren’t forgiven on the cross because Christ said “finished” one moment before he gave his last breath. The cross was all judgement! Instead we are forgiven at salvation.

The salvation ministry of Jesus Christ on the Cross must be distinguished from the doctrine of forgiveness.
Redemption was the decision of Jesus Christ in eternity past as eternal God and fulfilled on the Cross as true humanity.
Forgiveness is the decision of mankind in time under two categories related to human sins.

Category one is the forgiveness of all pre-salvation sins at the moment of faith alone in Christ alone. Category two is the forgiveness of all post-salvation sins resulting from the fulfillment of the protosis of 1 Jn 1:9, “If we acknowledge our sins.”
Forgiveness depends on redemption and is the result of redemption. There is no forgiveness of sins in redemption and atonement, only the judgment of all sins.

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The accusative case:

Most people will encounter the term accusative case when studying a language other than English.
Examples of the Accusative Case
Here are some examples of the accusative case with an explanation of how to find the direct object:

She stroked the cat.
Step 1. Find the verb = “stroked”
Step 2. Ask “What?” = “the cat”

Therefore, the direct object is the cat. The words the cat are in the accusative case. Luckily for us, nouns do not change their forms in the accusative case. Some pronouns do though.

Barney will draw him tomorrow.
Step 1. Find the verb = “will draw”
Step 2. Ask “What?” = “him”

Therefore, the direct object is him. The pronoun him is in the accusative case. It has changed from he to him.

The Accusative Case Is the Objective Case
In English, we use the term objective case for the accusative case and the dative case.
Read more at http://www.grammar-monster.com/glossary/accusative_case.htm#fQoSTlHEObhKz2IZ.99

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.Definition of the noun, Apposition

ap·po·si·tion
ˌapəˈziSHən/
noun
noun: apposition; plural noun: appositions
1.
technical
the positioning of things or the condition of being side by side or close together.
2.
Grammar
a relationship between two or more words or phrases in which the two units are grammatically parallel and have the same referent (e.g., my friend Sue ; the first US president, George Washington.

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Jesus Christ was judged on the Cross for all sins of human history. There are two categories of sin in human history for which He was judged—pre-salvation sins and post-salvation sins.
All pre-salvation sins are forgiven at the moment we exercise a one time positive option–faith in Jesus Christ, Jn 3:18, 36.
All post-salvation sins are forgiven at the point of using the rebound technique, 1 Jn 1:9.
Because all sins were judged on the Cross, the solution to pre-salvation sins in the status of spiritual death is faith in Christ.
Because all sins were judged on the Cross, the solution to post-salvation sinning in the status of carnality is solved through the rebound technique. In both cases, there is no merit in the function of the subject. In the both cases, we use non-meritorious volition and all the work is done by God.
We have two forgivenesses based on the salvation ministry of Jesus Christ on the Cross.
The forgiveness related to faith in Christ means all pre-salvation sins are blotted out and results in eternal life. The forgiveness related to rebound means all post-salvation sins are cancelled with regard to their repercussions and results in restoration of fellowship with God.

Col 1:14 , in whom we have our redemption, the forgiveness of our sins: (Is an Atticism)

See: “Doctrine of Forgiveness

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1Jn 1:9

1. “If we admit our sins,”
a. John gives us another conditional sentence, which describes a general present condition throughout the Church Age that is a real probability for all of us.
b. The subject “we” refers to all Church Age believers, but is true of all believers throughout human history as well. The principle taught here is not unique to the Church Age, but is a universal truth for all human history.
c. John makes a fair assumption here that believers sin after salvation. His condition is based upon this assumption, which he knows to be true from his own personal experience as well as a the experience of other Christians and the direct statements in the word of God.
d. The word “sins” in the plural refers to the personal sins committed by the believer after salvation. This is not a salvation context for the unbeliever and has nothing to do with being saved. No unbeliever is ever asked by God to acknowledge their sins in order to be saved. That is a legalistic, heretical doctrine that comes from satanic religion.
e. The key word for interpretation in this phrase is the word “admit/acknowledge/name.”
(1) Believers have the option of admitting their personal sins or not. If we do so, then God does what is described in this verse. If we do not then we receive judgment and discipline from God.
(2) Admitting we have done something wrong does not require emotion or feeling sorry for what we have done. God does not ask us to feel sorry, He asks us to acknowledge to Him that we know and understand and realize that what we have done is wrong and a violation of what He wants and desires.
(3) Naming or admitting our sins to God is a private matter between us and God. The act of admitting described here does not say that we must do this to other believers or to a priest or to everyone in the local church. The implication is that we must admit our sins to God. That requires prayer, and this kind of prayer is done in the privacy of our royal priesthood.
(4) God does not ask us to feel guilty. We may be ashamed of ourselves, which is a good thing, because it means we still have a conscience that functions properly. However, God is not interested in how guilty we feel. God cannot base His forgiveness on how badly we feel. That would be unfair and unjust to the person who does not feel badly enough. How badly must we feel to be forgiven? How do we know when to feel worse or feel better? Are we to continue feeling guilty and bad for the rest of our life and never recover? You see, our feeling has no place in God’s forgiveness. It only confuses the issue.
(5) Admitting we have done wrong is a matter of objectivity on our part and taking the responsibility for our actions.
(6) Admitting our sins is judging ourselves, and judging ourselves frees the justice of God from continuing divine discipline against us. Paul explains in 1 Cor 11:30-32, “For this reason among you many are weak and sick and a large number sleep. But if we had been judging ourselves, we would not have been judged. However, when we are being judged, we are disciplined by the Lord, in order that we might not be condemned with the world.”
(7) The moment we sin, the righteousness of God demands that the justice of God judge and discipline us. This discipline continues through the three stages of divine discipline or judgment, described by Paul as being weak, sick, and sleeping, which are metaphors for warning discipline, intensive discipline, and dying discipline.
(8) When the believer uses the recovery procedure described here as admitting his or her sins to God (the rebound technique of bouncing back into fellowship with God), God exercises one of three options on the believer’s behalf. God turns discipline into suffering for blessing. All suffering for blessing is designed to accelerate spiritual growth.
(a) The removal of all disciplinary suffering.
(b) Disciplinary suffering is diminished, but is now designed for blessing. The reason the suffering is reduced is so that you can bear it. God never gives us more than we can bear in fellowship.
(c) Disciplinary suffering continues at the same intensity, but is now designed for blessing. It continues at the same intensity because you can bear it and gain blessing from it. Job 5:17‑18, “Behold, happy is the man whom God reproves. Therefore, do not despise the discipline of EL SHADDAI [the many‑breasted God, Provider of logistical grace]; for He inflicts pain and He bandages the wound. He wounds [intensive discipline] and His hands heal.”
(9) Judging ourselves is synonymous with admitting or acknowledging our sins to God. The moment we judge ourselves God stops the divine discipline and turns cursing into blessing for the believer in fellowship with Him.
f. When we sin, we put ourselves out of fellowship with God. We are no longer in agreement with God about something. For example, God says fornication is bad for us. We don’t agree with God and fornicate. Our disagreement with God has put us out of fellowship with Him.
g. When we admit we were wrong, we are again agreeing with God that He was right and we were wrong. God restores His fellowship with us because we again agree with Him about the sin we committed.
h. When we do not admit our sins, we continue to receive divine discipline and suffer greatly from our own self-induced misery from the bad decisions we keep on making. As we perpetuate carnality, the discipline intensifies until we die.
i. However, God has graciously provided from His love the means by which we can recover immediately from sin and continue in fellowship with Him. We simply name our sin or sins to God in the privacy of our own soul.
j. You might say, “That’s too easy. Where’s the satisfaction of the justice of God?” The answer to this legalistic arrogance is that it was not too easy for Christ on the Cross as He bore the punishment for our sins as a substitute for us. The justice of God was satisfied on the Cross, which is why the justice of God no longer has to be satisfied by punishing us for our sins.
k. Therefore, if we are not punished for our sins because Christ was punished for us, then why do we receive divine discipline when we sin? We made a decision to disagree with God about what He wanted and are doing what we want in spite of God. We are squelching or suppressing the Holy Spirit and grieving the Holy Spirit. We are disciplined for grieving, quenching, squelching, or suppressing the Holy Spirit.
l. In reality the judgment for personal sins occurred on the Cross, and we cannot be judged for what Christ was already judged. That would be double jeopardy and would be unfair of God.
m. Therefore, God does not punish us for our personal sins, but for our turning against him, rejecting His will, defying Him, and doing what we want in spite of Him.

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2. “He is faithful and righteous
a. John now gives us the promise from the integrity and love of God.
b. This promise is based upon the character and essence of God.
c. Two of God’s attributes are mentioned here that are critical to the recovery procedure of the spiritual life.
d. God is faithful to us when we admit our sins to Him.
(1) Faithfulness means God does the same thing every time.
(2) It does not matter how bad the sin or sins were, or how long we were out of fellowship with God. God remains faithful and does the same thing consistently.
(3) God cannot and will not be unfaithful to us. He will faithfully forgive us every single time we sin, no matter how much or how often we sin.
(4) The severity and frequency of our sin is not the issue with the integrity of God. What matters to God is that He remains faithful to consistently do the same thing every time we acknowledge our sin or sins to Him.
e. The second most important thing to God when we admit our sins to Him is that He do the right thing.
(1) Every time we name our sins to God, He does the right thing.
(2) God must not only do the right thing, but He must faithfully do the right thing.
(3) God is never wrong to forgive us. He can never be wrong because our Lord already paid the price for our sins, being judged as a substitute for us. He paid our penalty for us.
(4) Therefore, God the Father can instantly forgive us every time and always be right in the process.

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3. “with the result that He forgives us our sins,”
a. Now comes the promise of God. The result of our admitting of our personal sins to God is that God forgives us.
b. God is right to forgive us.
c. God is faithful to forgive us.
d. The forgiveness of God is a guarantee we have from God and is not based upon our using the faith-rest drill to trust in His forgiveness.
e. This verse states a dogmatic promise that God will absolutely do the same thing every time we name our sins to God.
f. Our forgiveness is not based on how we feel, or our trust in God, or anything else about us, other than the fact we admitted our sins to Him.
g. The fact that God forgives sin is one of the great principles of Scripture.
(1) The pattern for such pardon and forgiveness is found in Isa 43:25, “I, even I, am He who blots out your transgressions for My own sake [because of My honor and integrity]. Furthermore, I will not remember your sin.”
(2) The pattern of forgiveness is applied to the believer as part of the royal family honor code. Col 3:13, “Bearing one another and forgiving each other. Whoever has a complaint against anyone else, just as the Lord forgave you, so also you should forgive others.”
(3) Eph 4:32, “Be kind to one another, tender-hearted, forgiving each other just as God in Christ has also forgiven you.” This describes the winner-believer. He is tender-hearted and forgives others on the basis of the fact that God has forgiven him.
h. Forgiveness is the result of the salvation ministry of Jesus Christ on the Cross. There is no forgiveness on the Cross. The Cross was all judgment, and judgment is not forgiveness.
i. There are two categories of forgiveness for believers.
(1) All pre-salvation sins were blotted out the moment you believed in Christ so you could receive the filling of the Spirit and thirty-nine other things.
(2) All post salvation sins are forgiven at the moment of rebound. Failure to use the grace provision of 1 Jn 1:9 results in perpetual carnality. That means the status quo of grieving the Holy Spirit (Eph 4:30) and squelching the Holy Spirit (1 Thes 5:19).
j. What Jesus Christ did on the Cross did not provide forgiveness. Forgiveness is not a part of the Cross. The work of Jesus Christ on the Cross did not include forgiveness. Pre-salvation sins were forgiven the moment you believed in Christ. Post salvation sins are forgiven the moment you rebound. But if you do not rebound, you continue in a state of carnality until you die the sin unto death. The unbeliever’s sins are never forgiven because he never believes in Christ. But they are judged for their works at the last judgment which include their failure to believe in Christ and not for their sins. There is no forgiveness in redemption. There is the opportunity of freedom through faith alone in Christ alone.
k. Forgiveness is not a part of redemption, but a result of redemption. Eph 1:6-7, “to the praise of the glory of His grace, with which He [F] has graced us out in the Beloved [Jesus Christ]; by agency of Whom [Jesus Christ] we have redemption through His blood, [we have] the forgiveness of trespasses on the basis of the riches of His grace.” The word “redemption” and the word “forgiveness in verse seven are both in the accusative case and there is no such thing as an accusative of apposition in the Greek. Therefore, the phrase “the forgiveness of sins” is not an explanation (in apposition) of the phrase “the redemption through His blood.”
(1) The word “forgiveness” is an accusative of result, and not an accusative of apposition. The word “redemption” is the accusative of direct object. Forgiveness is a result of redemption.
(2) These two accusatives are a double accusative: the accusative of direct object and the accusative of result. They can also be described as a double accusative of primary and secondary object. The primary objective is redemption. The secondary objective is forgiveness. One follows the other; they are not simultaneous. Forgiveness follows redemption. Forgiveness is separated from redemption.
(3) The concept is the same as we have in Col 1:14, “By agency of Whom we have redemption, the forgiveness of sins.” There is no concessive connotation here at all.
l. Forgiveness occurs at the moment of faith in Christ, not at the Cross. The moment of salvation is the first time God ever forgave you anything. You could not be forgiven anything until you were filled with the Spirit. God cannot give you thirty-nine irrevocable absolutes unless you are forgiven. There is no forgiveness at the Cross. You are forgiven after the Cross, when you believed in Christ, and every time you rebound. Some pastors erroneously teach that all forgiveness occurred at the Cross and therefore rebound is not necessary.
m. God has a perfect problem solving device for our post salvation sins: we admit them, He forgives them. Everything depends on who and what God is. The only thing that depends on us is our non-meritorious volition to do what God says we must do and name our sins to God.
n. We got out of fellowship with God by using our volition to disobey Him, now we must use our volition to obey Him, in order to get back in fellowship with Him.
o. The forgiveness of sins includes both our known and unknown sins.
(1) Known sins are the sins we know are sins and do them anyway.
(2) Unknown sins are things we do wrong that we do not realize are sins.

4. “and purifies us from all wrongdoing.”
a. There is another result along with the forgiveness of our sins. God purifies us from all wrongdoing.
b. Our wrongdoing includes the following:
(1) Grieving the Holy Spirit.
(2) Quenching, squelching, or suppressing the Holy Spirit.
(3) Lying to the Holy Spirit.
c. God wipes the slate clean and gives us a completely fresh start every time we name our sins to Him.
d. He completely cleanses or purifies us from everything we have done wrong, both our sins and our rejection of the love of God and rejection of our fellowship with God.
e. The recovery procedure of the spiritual life, also known as the rebound technique, is essential to maintaining our post salvation fellowship with God the Holy Spirit, and therefore, the execution of our spiritual life. Without rebound as the basis for problem solving devices, personal sin will destroy our spiritual life. Without rebound as our number one problem solving device, it would be impossible to be filled with the Spirit, learn doctrine, and avoid Christian degeneracy.